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You are here Here'Articles' African chiefs urged to apologise for slave trade Comment

Articles A full list of all of the articles on this website

How The British Empire Abolished Slavery
Black slavers resisted abolition Black slave traders resisted abolition by Britain
Jews & White Slavery Africa and the atlantic slave trade
Chiefs Apologise African chiefs urged to apologise for slave trade
History African slave traders: A history
Alex Haley Roots Alex Haley - Roots, fraudster,liar,plagiariser
Amistad Slave Ship Amistad slave ship, Joseph Cinque was a slave trader
Slavery and Race Slavery and race
Black Slave Owners Dixie's censored subject: black slave owners
Black Slave Traders Black African slave traders
Black slave owners and slave masters Black slaveowners & slave masters
Sell Out Did african slave traders sell us out ?
European imperialism ended slavery worldwide European imperialism ended slavery worldwide
Britain 1807 In 1807 Britain outlawed slavery
Slavery Slavery in the Arab World
Islamic Slavery Islamic Slavery and Racism
Slavery in Israel Contraband Women - naive slavic women in Israel
Jews & White Slavery Jews and the white slave trade
Blaming White Folk On Blaming White Folk For Slavery
Sex slavery Israel Sex slavery in Israel today
Slavery African Connection Slave Trade: the African Connection, ca 1788
Slavery & Race Slavery and Race: Gearld A Foster
Slavery Africa Slavery in Africa
Slavery Myths Slavery myths debunked
Truth about Slavery The truth about slavery
White Slaves White Slaves, African Masters

William Wilberforce (Amazing Grace)
Anti Slavery Campaigner

William Wilberforce From
William Wilberforce (1759-1833) was a deeply religious man whose political views were very conservative, but who devoted most of his parliamentary career to the abolition of the slave trade and slavery.

He also campaigned for legislation to prohibit the worst forms of child labor, cruelty to animals and the removal of political disabilities on Roman Catholics. He fought to abolish the slave trade which, after many years of defeats, he finally achieved in 1807.

However, this did not abolish slavery.
He would frequently introduce a private member’s Bill abolishing slavery.

Year after year his Bills were defeated until, finally, late on Friday July 26, 1833, as he lay on his deathbed, his friend, Thomas Babington Macaulay, the famous historian and member of the Society for the Mitigation and Gradual Abolition of Slavery throughout the British Dominions, brought him word that the Slavery Abolition Bill 1833 abolishing slavery throughout the British Empire had been read a third time (which means that it had been passed) by the House of Commons.

Passage of the Bill through the House of Lords was assured.

Wilberforce exclaimed:
"Thank God that I have lived to witness the day in which England is willing to give £20 million for the abolishment of slavery."
(What would that be worth today ?)

He died three days later. It was agreed that he should be in Westminster Abbey in London.

The Slavery Abolition Bill 1833 passed through the House of Lords, it received the Royal Assent (which means it became law) on 29 August 1833 and came into force on 1 August 1834.

On that date slavery was abolished throughout the vast British Empire.

The Act automatically applied as new possessions (principally in Africa) subsequently became part of the British Empire.

William Wilberforce - A Great Man Forgotten

The British Crusade Against Slavery

Abraham Lincoln and the abolition of slavery

Origins of the Slave Trade - Africans sold Africans

The untold story of the Arab Slave Trade Of Africans

The truth about The Arab Slave Trade In Sudan

The Truth About Slavery: Past, Present and Future
Rogues Gallery Rogues Gallery ... 
The tiniest fraction of those first and second-generation immigrants who have killed, raped and otherwise violated British men, women and children in Britain,( Just since the Stephen Lawrence case ! )
is represented in the following pages. How many had you heard of before you saw them here ??
Top 10 Black Slave Owners Top 10 Black Slave Owners
9 Facts About Slavery 9 Facts About Slavery
They Don't Want You to Know



African chiefs urged to apologise for slave trade
Nigerian civil rights group says tribal leaders' ancestors sold people to slavers and should say sorry like US and Britain.

Traditional African rulers whose ancestors collaborated with European and Arab slave traders should follow Britain and the United States by publicly saying sorry, according to human rights organisations.

The Civil Rights Congress of Nigeria has written to tribal chiefs saying: "We cannot continue to blame the white men, as Africans, particularly the traditional rulers, are not blameless."

The appeal has reopened a sensitive debate over the part some chiefs played in helping to capture their fellow Africans and sell them into bondage as part of the transatlantic slave trade. The congress argued that the ancestors of the chiefs had helped to raid and kidnap defenceless communities and traded them to Europeans. They should now apologise to "put a final seal to the history of slave trade", it said. "In view of the fact that the Americans and Europe have accepted the cruelty of their roles and have forcefully apologised, it would be logical, reasonable and humbling if African traditional rulers ... [can] accept blame and formally apologise to the descendants of the victims of their collaborative and exploitative slave trade."

Estimates vary that between 10 million and 28 million Africans were sent to the Americas and sold into slavery between 1450 and the early 19th century. More than a million are believed to have died in transit across the so-called "middle passage" of the Atlantic due to inhumane conditions aboard slave ships and the brutal crushing of any resistance. Three years ago Tony Blair described Britain's participation as a "crime against humanity" and expressed his "deep sorrow". The US Senate voted for an apology this year.

Shehu Sani, head of the congress, said it was calling for traditional rulers to apologise now because they were seeking inclusion in a forthcoming constitutional amendment in Nigeria. "We felt that for them to have the moral standing to be part of our constitutional arrangement there are some historical issues for them to address," he told the BBC World Service. "One part of which is the involvement of their institutions in the slave trade." He said that on behalf of the buyers of slaves, the ancestors of the traditional rulers "raided communities and kidnapped people, shipping them away across the Sahara or across the Atlantic".

Many slaves captured inland in Africa died on the long journey to the coast.

The position was endorsed by Henry Bonsu, a British-born broadcaster of Ghanaian descent who examined the issue in Ghana for a radio documentary. He said some chiefs had accepted responsibility and sought atonement by visiting Liverpool and the United States. "I interviewed a chief who acknowledged there was collaboration and that without that involvement we wouldn't have seen human trafficking on an industrial scale," said Bonsu, the co-founder of digital station Colourful Radio. "An apology in Nigeria might be helpful because the chiefs did some terrible things and abetted a major crime."

The non-government organisation Africa Human Right Heritage, based in Accra, Ghana, supports the campaign for an apology. Baffour Anning, its chief executive, said: "I certainly agree with the Nigeria Civil Rights Congress that the traditional leaders should render an apology for their role in the inhuman slavery administration." He said it would accord with the UN's position on human rights. But the issue was not a high priority for most African citizens, according to Bonsu. "In my experience it's mainly the African diaspora who want an apology. People aren't milling around Lagos or Accra moaning about why chiefs don't apologise. They are more concerned about the everyday and why they still have bad governance."

Fred Swaniker, the founder of the African Leadership Academy, said: "I'm not sure whether an apology is needed, but it would be worth looking at and acknowledging the role Africa did play in the slave trade. Someone had to find the slaves and bring them before the Europeans."

The shameful history of some traditional leaders remains an awkward subject on which many politicians prefer to maintain silence. One exception was in 1998 when Yoweri Museveni, the president of Uganda, told an audience including Bill Clinton: "African chiefs were the ones waging war on each other and capturing their own people and selling them. If anyone should apologise it should be the African chiefs. We still have those traitors here even today."